Making Sense of Your Laboratory Values

Making Sense of Your Laboratory Values

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Lauren Phillips, MS, RD, LDN Renal Dietitian __ Keeping nutrition related laboratory values straight can be an overwhelming task even for the most seasoned people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). The following is a quick reference guide to a few of the most common nutrition related laboratory values. Albumin – maintaining albumin within goal helps the immune system fight infection and inflammation, build muscle, and improve healing time after surgeries/injuries. Possible causes for low albumin include inflammation, liver disease, infection, malnutrition, fluid overload, and surgery. This will usually appear on your lab report as albumin. On your lab report, the goal for albumin is generally 3.5-5.5 g/dL. If your albumin is out of range, talk with your nephrologist and dietitian about what might be…
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Flavoring Foods Without Salt — The Kidney Patient’s Guide to Herbs and Spices

Kidney Disease, low-salt, Renal Diet
Stephanie Legin, RD, LDN Renal Dietitian -- Did you know that salt is an acquired taste?   Most foods in their natural state contain some amount of sodium. The words “salt” and “sodium” are often used interchangeably; however, sodium is actually one of the two minerals found inside of "salt" - which is also known by the chemical name "sodium-chloride" — because salt is a combination of sodium and chloride. Modern day food processing and consumer demand for convenience foods (canned, packaged, “fast” foods) have contributed to our increased tolerance for salty foods.  In the evolution of food processing, we have forgotten how delicious natural whole foods taste because of our unnatural obsession with salt, or condiments containing salt. The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend less than 2,300 milligrams (mg)…
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