Heart Health: Ticker Talk with Renal Disease

Heart Health: Ticker Talk with Renal Disease

Heart health, Kidney Disease
Heart Health: Ticker Talk with Renal Disease Marika Wamback, BSc. R.D. Renal Dietitian Did you know that February is Heart Health Month?  Since February is usually associated with love, flowers, chocolates, and hearts for Valentine’s Day, it is also associated with keeping a vital muscle and pump system in tip top shape! Your Heart's Function The heart is a muscle in the body that operates like a pump; pumping blood to every single part of the body through arteries and veins.  Blood carries oxygen, nutrients, fluids, and electrolytes, all of which are vital for survival.  These nutrients are also essential for a healthy heart.  Without them, the heart cannot function optimally, reducing pumping and blood flow.  Or, it must work harder, increasing stress on the heart. Unfortunately, heart disease is…
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Making Sense of Your Laboratory Values

Making Sense of Your Laboratory Values

Kidney Disease
Lauren Phillips, MS, RD, LDN Renal Dietitian Keeping nutrition related laboratory values straight can be an overwhelming task even for the most seasoned people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). The following is a quick reference guide to a few of the most common nutrition related laboratory values. Albumin Maintaining albumin within goal helps the immune system fight infection and inflammation, build muscle, and improve healing time after surgeries/injuries. Possible causes for low albumin include inflammation, liver disease, infection, malnutrition, fluid overload, and surgery. This will usually appear on your lab report as albumin. On your lab report, the goal for albumin is generally 3.5-5.5 g/dL. If your albumin is out of range, talk with your nephrologist and dietitian about what might be causing a…
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Flavoring  Foods Without Salt — The Kidney Patient’s Guide to Herbs and Spices

Flavoring Foods Without Salt — The Kidney Patient’s Guide to Herbs and Spices

Kidney Disease, low-salt, Renal Diet
Stephanie Legin, RD, LDN Renal Dietitian Did you know that salt is an acquired taste?   Most foods in their natural state contain some amount of sodium. The words “salt” and “sodium” are often used interchangeably; however, sodium is actually one of the two minerals found inside of "salt" - which is also known by the chemical name "sodium-chloride" — because salt is a combination of sodium and chloride. Modern day food processing and consumer demand for convenience foods (canned, packaged, “fast” foods) have contributed to our increased tolerance for salty foods.  In the evolution of food processing, we have forgotten how delicious natural whole foods taste because of our unnatural obsession with salt, or condiments containing salt. The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of…
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Realistic Resolutions for Continual Health

Uncategorized
Marika Wamback, R.D. Renal Dietitian -- Happy new year!  As we welcome in 2018, many of us will want to start the year off with healthy goals; the top ones being losing weight, and quitting smoking.  These are admirable goals, but often, people quit just as they’re getting started.  This is because they have not set realistic goals for sustainable change.  With kidney disease, it can be even more of a challenge, due to the constant monitoring of kidney function.  Kidney disease can often feel like a lifestyle in and of itself. Realistic resolutions will help you, whether or not you have kidney disease. Making them work for you in the long term is key.  With food costs increasing in 2018 and increase cost in dining out, and with constantly…
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Getting To Know Your Kidneys

Kidney Disease
Stephanie Legin, RD, LDN Renal Dietitian Getting to Know Your Kidneys Did You Know? Renal is a medical term meaning “having to do with the kidneys." High blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of kidney failure.  Controlling blood sugar and blood pressure levels is key in protecting the kidneys and preventing or slowing kidney disease.  Other risk factors include heart disease, obesity, and a family history of CKD 35% of people aged 20 years or older with diabetes have chronic kidney disease         Statistics CKD is estimated to be more common in women than in men (16% vs 13%) 30 million people or 15% of US adults  (1 in 7 adults aged 18 and older) are estimated to have CKD An estimated 12.5% of…
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